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The friendship bracelet and the Time's Up dress code

The friendship bracelet. Three strands of brightly coloured thread plaited together with feverish fingers and tied onto a best friend's wrist. There it remains, slowly fraying, coated in equal parts sticky food residue and love.
A small, childish token of insignificant value which speaks a thousand words of comradeship, dedication and shared experience – dipped into sand pits, spaghetti hoops and Matey bubble baths. Taking into itself the laughs, tears and grazed knees of a child's friendship. Powerful as a talisman.
Then we have the BAFTAs. Yet another glittering awards ceremony with an all-black dress code. Actresses from film and television donning black gowns to stand together in support of the UK's Time's Up campaign – a rousing cry to end sexual harassment and abuse in the workplace.
This is becoming an all too familiar sight perhaps, following on as it does from the Golden Globes and the Grammy Awards, where the red carpet was equally awash with rustling black …
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A woman accompanies her handbag into an x-ray scanner – it must have been Chanel

So here we are in 2018, witnessing what must be the greatest building of momentum towards gender equality since the mass availability of the contraceptive pill in the 1960's and before that, the small matter of the Suffrage movement.
We have seen women, and men, take to the streets of our capital cities in their thousands upon thousands in Women's Marches against American President, the ever misogynistic, Donald Trump. We have watched the social media campaign against sexual harassment #MeToo gain such momentum that essays and articles have been set aside to discuss whether it is really a force for good or men's undoing – a sure sign it's working.
We have seen the net around Hollywood film producer Harvey Weinstein start to tighten as legal charges are brought against him, along with the dawning realisation that a stint in a swish rehab centre in Arizona is not going to be enough to atone publicly for his sins.
We have witnessed the great and good of Hollywood stand a…

Labour want all tenants to be allowed a pet – until then there's the Leo trainers from Hush

There's a plethora of things we declare we will do once we grow up and own our own house. We'll have a West Elm navy blue sofa, slather all our walls in charcoal grey paint, host sophisticated dinner parties with three courses cooked lovingly, and proficiently, from out of the Nigella cook book. We'll own a table runner, scatter cushions, Tupperware and cake forks. Napkin holders, mugs without chips.
We'll grow herbs and radishes and rambling roses in our very own garden, with a summer house at the bottom which will become our office, once we finally ditch our job and go freelance. Steadily taking over the world from our Ikea work station, with self-closing drawers – when we're all grown up and own our own house.
But top of the list above all of this domestic paraphernalia is the wish, the hope, the life-fulfilling statement, that one day when we're all grown up and have our own place, we'll have a pet. A miniature Schnauzer, a long-haired Dachshund, a p…

We don't need a female James Bond – Women's stories are just as valid in floaty florals as masculine tuxedos

Hollywood actress Rachel Weisz has spoken out this week saying she does not believe James Bond need ever be played by a woman. I didn't realise it before – but I agree.
There is always heightened speculation around who will play the next James Bond. By design it is ever changeable and the choice, arguably, reflects what is a la mode at the time. Therefore at this cultural crossroads in our history - which appears to have come about through a mixture of ultra political correctness combined with naturally freer attitudes to stereotypes - the next actor, or actress, to play Bond could be especially interesting. There has been speculation over whether the role will be given to a white man as appears to be tradition or whether a black actor or even a woman could fill Bond's shoes.
One actress who won't be putting herself forward for Bond casting is Rachel Weisz, who happens to be married to current James Bond actor Daniel Craig. Speaking to The Telegraph, she said she believes…

Banning sexist advertising is like the lilac lapel coat from Acne Studios – impractical yet desirable

Sweden – the mystical land of unbreakable darkness and enduring daylight. Of fresh, crisp air and achingly cool style. A haven for all things foodie, as long as it's fermented or laced in lingonberries. The fatherland of Ikea flat pack furniture, Abba, picture postcard forests and story book bears.
And now also the land where all outdoor sexist advertising is banned – in Stockholm at least, with other Swedish cities set to follow suit. The question is, do we the British adopt the same policy for our own advertising, as we have taken in H&M, & Other Stories and Monki to our own high streets, or does what constitutes sexist prove so problematic, it's akin to asking how long is a piece of string? Let's delve in.
Stockholm City Council recently agreed to ban all outdoor advertising that perpetuated sexist stereotypes from its city. Daniel Hellden, one of the capital city's deputy mayors has been pushing for the ban for three years. He explained that sexist adverti…