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Bottling it, cashmere and purchase of the week - the co-ord.

This reporter wonders if anyone else is finding summer dressing increasingly problematic? She declares she feels very much like a hyperactive puppy chasing its own tail when it comes to assessing the various potential weather conditions of the day and trying to dress accordingly. Only to find she has sufficiently clothed herself for a day which occurred earlier in the week and today's clothes will indeed be more appropriate for the weather conditions a fortnight on Thursday.

In her despair, this reporter has turned to the sartorial self-help bible which is Vogue, which is declaring the co-ord our fashion saviour this summer. Now, this reporter would immediately like to reassure her readers she has not spelled 'cord' as in corduroy wrong (now that would be a seasonally inappropriate fashion blunder). No co-ord (and she apologises if she is preaching to the already initiated) is short for co-ordinated - a co-ordinated outfit akin to a suit but slightly less formal in fabric and cut. Indeed it can refer to any matching two-piece including 90's favourite, the Canadian tuxedo.

However, if you have never been much of a fan of the 'double denim' or indeed do not have any line-dancing classes to attend anytime soon, the co-ord stretches to all manner of other material confections. Try matching silk pyjama pieces, camouflage top to toe, athlesuire ensembles (that's your tracksuit right there) or go 'wild' and try a white denim skirt and jacket combo. This reporter is musing over this stripy number from Elder Statesman (the top's here and the bottoms are very much there) but as the designer's name suggests, perhaps we should all be old enough to know better.

In more news which has quite frankly blown the roof of previous generation's money-saving ideals of buying quality over quantity, ASOS, the mega online clothing store, has announced it will no longer be stocking silk or cashmere.

In a move to boost animal welfare, amidst abhorrent evidence of huge animal suffering to procure these luxury fabrics - and following hot on the heels of the decision ASOS and other retailers including M&S made to ban mohair from goats - there will be no more silk shirts or cashmere jumpers on site from January 2019. Instead clothing will be made from more man-made fabrics - the ones we were told to stay away from for fear they'd break us out in a sweat.

A story to warm the cockles, even on the most inclement of days, (the type this reporter currently dreams of) is that of devoted husband, 84-year-old Des Monahan who has learnt to do his 83-year-old wife's make-up before she goes blind.

Mona Monahan suffers from debilitating deterioration to her sight and one day she will be completely blind. Her husband wants to make sure she looks and feels her best, however, even when she can no longer see, and so he has learnt to apply her make-up for her.

Des and Mona have been going for lessons at their local Debenhams since October last year. Rosie O-Driscoll, who works for the brand Benefit, said: "When we first started Des had no idea what brushes to use for each part of the face but now he's an expert".

Mood change alert and today's headlines bring us news Donald Trump has signed an executive order abandoning the policy of separating refugee children from their detained parents. Good news you say? Not exactly. First and foremost this reporter is very concerned about how this particularly abhorrent episode in America's history is recorded for prosperity, as Trump attempts to give the impression he has swept in as the saviour of a cruelty which has absolutely nothing to do with him.

Secondly, this order appears to do nothing to bring about the return of the 2,300 children already taken away. Whilst Trump's replacement policy seeks to replace family separation with indefinite family detention. Need we remind ourselves, these are people not seeking a life of freeloading. They are fleeing for their lives.

Meanwhile, there are no two ways about it, the Brexit rebels have well and truly bottled it. There were quite extraordinary scenes in Parliament yesterday (Wednesday) as a vote was taken to an amendment to the EU Withdrawal Bill which would see all MPs given a proper say on the final Brexit deal.

Theresa May and her cronies had been so concerned about defeat, they had literally wheeled in ministers from their sick beds to cast their yay or neigh, but they need not have fretted. Almost all the Tory rebels, including Dominic Grieve who put forward the amendment in the first place, ended up not voting in its favour, happy, they said, to trust Mrs May's informal reassurance that all MP's would  have some kind of say before the final Brexit bill was past.

Grieve had previously said he was prepared to bring down Mrs May and her government to assure all MPs got a meaningful vote on Brexit. Yesterday he was reported as saying he was fearful his actions would bring down the government. Um what, come again?

This reporter questions whether all us remainers actually dreamt the last few months?

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