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Laundrettes, Brexit Beano and the Valentino throw-back mini dress

"You spin me right round, baby right round like a record, baby round round round round."

Oh hello there. I'll just turn the radio down. I'm at the laundrette, washing my clothes. Because we're all going to be doing this soon. Using laundrettes that is. They are popping back up everywhere. Perhaps not so much this side of the M25 but nevertheless, this is the future when it comes to washing, according to those in the fashion know.

Not perhaps as we once knew it. Carrier bags full of dirty washing self-consciously flung into big bellied washers, Dot Cotton-esque laundry assistants greeting you with a box of cheap soap suds, fag hanging out of mouth. It's all gone just that little bit chicer.

Hermes have launched a Hermesmatic laundrette service complete with bright orange, Instagrammable, machines specially to launder and service their Hermes silk scarves. Other brands are following suit, with the denim brand American Eagle opening a concept store and free laundry service near New York University for students to bring their washing to and have a beer whilst they wait.

The Japanese laundrette chain Wash and Fold offers a machine specially to wash trainers whilst Powder Laundry in Australia is millennial pink and coin free, washers operated via an app.

There is a green-side to this new trend - the hope that with more people using laundrettes again we will reduce our carbon footprint from indulging in over washing our clothes at home. Others spout that the appeal of the laundrette is about nostalgia and, in this increasingly socially disconnected world, having that human contact again.

Talking of yearning for nostalgia, there's news on Brexit. It appears Prime Minister Theresa May, like many an university student facing a dissertation deadline, works best under immense pressure. Because - despite having to deal with the potential threat of Cold War with Russia and the fallout from the Cambridge Analytica scandal, which has seen Facebook users irrationally deleting their accounts since it was revealed the social networking site had been mined for data - she has only gone and sorted out the Brexit transition period.

Mrs May has, inevitably, been much criticised for her chosen arrangements with the European Union over this curious limbo period between when we officially leave the EU (in March next year) and when we are "free, to do what we want to do", two years after that.

Staunch Brexiteer Nigel Farage has reportedly completely lost his nut, last spotted throwing fish off the back of a boat on the River Thames. The rumour is this is something to do with protest against Britain losing its fishing rights throughout the transition period but that doesn't appear to wash with the many pretty sure Farage has never cared about fish.

In a completely unconnected story, aquarium owners are said to have suffered a mysterious overnight diminishing of stock.

The best thing to come out of Brexit thus far, and the competition has obviously been immense (this reporter jests) is the Brexit Beano comic. This is a frankly genius monthly publication dreamt up and executed by illustrator and author Mike Dicks. Inspired, not just by the much-loved Beano comic of yesteryear, but 1960's children's TV classic Trumpton.

The Brexit comic, which - it gets better - comes in paper form, boasts characters including Reverend May and her Brexit Gang, David "Dealin" Davis and Boris "Captain Brexit" Johnson and also features a familiar, yet slightly altered, roll call to all those who enjoyed the Trumpton TV series the first time round or have had the joy of catching up with it on VHS since.

Instead of Trumpton's infamous "Pugh, Pugh, Barney, McGrew, Cuthbert, Dibble, Grubb", the Brexit Beano refrain runs "May, May, Johnson and Gove, Macron, Merkel, Mogg" - the two May characters reflecting the Prime Minster's shifting position on Brexit.

This reporter declares this is her kind of nostalgia. To celebrate let's don this Valentino dress. It has just the right amount of the 60's mod about it without trying to impose its sovereignty.

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