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Mr and Mrs 'Fashion', peace prize for Trump and the couples t-shirts

Right. No dilly-dallying around the bush today. Let's go straight in with a good old shouty, journalistic intro. (And yes, this reporter does realise she has defeated her own object with the words above.)

Not content with reaching the dizzying heights of footballing super stardom, David Beckham has decided to tackle the fashion world.

The top footballer, formerly known as 'Golden Balls', has been appointed ambassador of British Fashion by the British Fashion Council. It is hoped in this figurehead role, Beckham will be able to use his fame to not only attract a new generation of talent into the industry, but globally use the Beckham name to encourage international investors to back talented young designers.

Most excitedly, for the tabloid newspapers at least, Mr Beckham's appointment, alongside his wife Victoria's 'renowned' status as a fashion designer, means they can now claim the title of the 'First British Couple of Fashion'.  (The thrones at their wedding now begin to make sense.)

Posing at a press conference in a long camel coat and plain white t-shirt, to prove he is indeed now all things 'fashion', Beckham said of his new role that it was a chance to "get under the skin of an industry he loved".

Perhaps there could be a future clothing collaboration between Mr and Mrs Beckham, this reporter muses. Something along the lines of his and hers t-shirts perchance?

Meanwhile in politics city, Prime Minister Theresa May is getting ahead of herself as usual by declaring next month she will publish the White Paper on the final vision for Britain post-Brexit.

The document will set out the future for the UK across key areas including trade, financial services and the final arrangements for the customs union, which - problematically - it was announced yesterday (Tuesday) had reached yet another stalemate.

Brexit Secretary David Davis has hailed the document as the "most significant publication on the EU since the referendum" and is an attempt to get on the 'front foot' in Brussels amid criticism that EU negotiators too often set the agenda, as well as to reassure MPs that Mrs May "has a plan".

This reporter does not feel overly optimistic, unless when Mrs May and Mr Davis say white paper they actually mean blank?

Talking about insanity, a pet dog raised by a Chinese family for two years has turned out to be, a black bear.

The owners say they grew suspicious when the 'dog' starting walking around on two legs. They were also a little taken aback by how much the 'dog' ate - amounting to a box of fruit and two buckets of noodles a day.

The bear has now been taken into care at the Yunnam Wildlife Rescue Centre after the family got in touch asking for help. This was not before the bear grew to be a metre tall and weighing 250lb. The family explained they bought the animal believing it to be a Tibetan mastiff while on holiday in 2016.

Nigel Farage's love for Donald Trump continues to run unabated, with the latest twist in the bro-mance amounting to Farage pledging to secure the American President the Nobel Peace Prize.

For a few months now there are been rumblings - fit to place dread in many a clear-thinking, sensible person's heart - that Mr 'I've got a bigger button than you' Trump could take the credit for North and South Korea finally agreeing to peace and dismantling their nuclear weapons. But it appears it could be the 'wheeler dealery' of Mr Farage which finally secures him the prize.

The right-wing British politician, who we can quite confidently blame for much of Brexit, wants to ruin the lives of the Americans now by starting a petition for his 'bezza mate' Trump to win the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes as far as to say if Trump does not win it, it will discredit the prize.

Worryingly, Farage does carry some clout on the issue. As an elected official in European Parliament he can make nominations for the award.

Trump meanwhile has proved suspiciously modest admist rumours of nomination. He said: "The prize I want is victory for the world. Not for even here - I want victory for the world, because that's what we're talking about. So that's the only prize I want."

Mr and Mrs Beckham had better get on with knocking up those matching his and hers t-shirts. The question is out of Farage and Trump, who will wear the 'hers'?


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