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The Hugh Grant Interview, appetite suppressing lollipops and the Jacquemus straw hat

"No more rom-coms for me" declares Hugh Grant. This reporter caught up with, arguably, the king of rom-com Mr Grant recently to find out more. Dim the lights, crank up the music player. Three, two, one...

"Fame, I'm gonna live forever..."

Good evening and welcome to Fame, the celebrity spotlight televisual programme, presented by none other than This Reporter. As you can see (!) we have moved to a brand new studio following last week's furore with Oasis legend Noel Gallagher.

This reporter recognises this new studio does not hold quite so much of the glamour, the pizazz, the je ne sais quoi of the former studio. Indeed it looks a little like someones disused box room, but the move was deemed necessary due to the threat of 'cataclysmic retribution'.

On with the show, and tonight's guest is a much-loved British actor, as famed for his floppy hair and endearing upper class hesitance, as his back catalogue of romantic comedic excellence. Starring in films including Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill and even taking on the role of Prime Minister in Love Actually  - and showing a real flair for the job (if only based on that Pointer Sister's dance) - please put your hands together for the one and only Hugh Grant.

"Jump, For my love, Jump in, And feel my touch..."

This Reporter: Hugh Grant, welcome to the show.

Hugh Grant: Thank-you very much. It is indeed a pleasure to be here.

This Reporter: Please begin by telling us a little bit about your latest acting project?

HG: Ah yes. I shall be playing the late liberal leader Jeremy Thorpe in a BBC drama called A Very British Scandal. It tells the story of how Thorpe faced trial on a charge of conspiracy to murder his former lover Norman Scott.

TR: A TV show? A bit of a departure for you?

HG: Well yes. There used to be quite a big snobbery about, 'Oh, I'm a film star now, I don't do television'. But that is eroding very fast. I saw De Niro's doing television now.

TR: Surely this doesn't spell the end for your rom-com film career?

HG: I've always tried to take whatever was the most entertaining thing in front of me at the time. And getting older and uglier has made the parts, you know, more varied. As for romantic comedy, I think that bird has flown.

TR: Surely not? Your fans will be devastated.

HG: You are too kind.

TR: (mutters - tell that to Noel Gallagher) I hear you had to go to some measures to prepare for the role of Thorpe?

HG: (laughs) You've heard about the bicycle. Yes well I bought a bicycle and went racing around Richmond Park in south-west London for four months to lose weight.

TR: The world of politics is not such an alien one to you. (Sees panic in Hugh's eyes, rushes on) And no I'm not going to question you on whether you would like to become Prime Minister. I'm referring to your work against press phone hacking.

HG: (relieved) Yes I've had quite a close-up experience of politics in the last six years doing stuff with Hacked Off and meeting politicians, and the motivations of politicians back in the 60s and 70s were really no different to today. I'm afraid the number one motive is always themselves and their career. 'How do I move up the Westminster ladder?' And that was certainly absolutely critical to Thorpe. He was incredibly ambitious.

TR: Thank-you, Hugh Grant there. And hopefully we will see him in just one more rom-com soon.

Perhaps Mr Grant would be interested in this summer's quite literally massive trend, the oversized straw hat. Taking up the boutique shelves of designers including Jacquemus, Sensi, Gucci and Missoni, the straw hat of quite ludicrously generous proportions is being billed by the fashion set as the hat "to be seen in, while not being seen".

Ideal for an actor who deep down still would love to play the leading man in a romantic comedy but is not quite so confident he has maintained the quintessential romantic lead looks. What do you say Hugh?

Alternatively, there is always the Kim Kardashian way of ensuring you are spotlight ready. The reality star of irrepressible irrelevance has right royally enraged the internet, and quite justifiably so, by promoting a range of appetite suppressing lollipops by FlatTummyCo.

Deemed as totally irresponsible towards her droves of impressionable young, and not so young, fans, critics have declared Ms Kardashian is promoting starvation.  Posing in her imitable style, topless and sucking one of the lollies on Tuesday, the vacuous star declared these lollipops are "literally unreal".

 If only responds this reporter, sagely concluding - oh the joyless pursuit of picture-perfect fame.

"...People will see me and cry".

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