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The 1930s People's March for Paul McCartney

It's Monday and welcome to another week where we are set to be boiled alive by Thursday, with temperatures out to rival Spain. ("Coming over here with your EU weather...") Whilst the mood is distinctly 1930s.

This reporter would like to quote from the Financial Times, which says: "The 1930s keep pressing their relevance. Mr Trump's efforts  - and those of European populists - to defeat integration borrow many of the tactics of that notorious decade. The 1930s playbook involved segregating minorities for crimes they did not commit.

"Mr Trump says the same about Hispanics. On Tuesday, he said the Democrats would allow illegal immigrants to 'infest our country'. By Thursday, he was accusing them of creating 'a massive child smuggling network' and of sponsoring an 'extreme open border policy. Data shows that areas of concentrated immigration in the US have lower crime rates than the average."

On the other side of the cultural divide, pop star Lily Allen tweeted: "When they taught us about Nazi Germany in school,  I could never understand how Hitler managed to get everyone onside. I mean I really could not understand how that happened. I look at what's happening now and tactics being used and I'm starting to see how."

To this end, Amazon, the delivery company, has spoken out, refusing to provide their facial recognition technology to the US, as similar devices were employed to help Hitler in the 1940s and we must "learn from history", they say.

At least if this is the 1930s we have the music hall to lift our spirits and speaking of which, the recent "joy" of the internet came from James Cordon's Carpool Karaoke with Sir Paul McCartney.

The Beatles Legend joined Cordon for a drive and sing-song through the streets of Liverpool, including a trip to Penny Lane, a drop in at McCartney's old barbers and a visit to his childhood home before culminating in the piece de resistance, an impromptu gig at the local pub.

No matter where you stand on Sir Paul, and this reporter has had her wobbles - Wings, Heather Mills, Stella McCartney's vegetarian sausages - the sheer "joy" his appearance at that pub created should be bottled.

Similarly prostrate at the feet of greatness was Prime Minister Theresa May, who acted the complete berk when she met with Prince William at the new Defence and National Rehabilitation Centre in Nottinghamshire. Her curtsy to the royal was so extraordinarily low it was almost complete Ms Overall. Scene two would surely have seen her return, shakily carrying two bowls of soup.

The question is would she have served them to Donald Trump's press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders who has been spouting off on Twitter after she was refused service at the Red Hen restaurant in Lexington because the proprietors felt they had "certain standards to uphold".

Ms Sanders has expressed outrage at this "discriminatory" behaviour but let's not forget, it was she who was all for Trump's policy for eateries to display "anti-gay" signs in their windows, in support of a bakeries refusal in 2017 to make a cake for a gay couple.

Finally, to the talking point of the weekend, and no this reporter is not referring to England's six-one win against Panama, though she is sure that would prove a more popular segment. No instead, she is talking about the 100,000 people who thronged London's streets for the People's March against Brexit.

The heaving crowd turned out to show their dissent towards us exiting Europe, with one popular thread being a call for a "people's vote" on the final Brexit deal with "remain in Europe" high amongst the options.

The hard Brexiteers have fought back declaring to Mrs May this is the time to employ Operation No Deal Brexit, with Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson making an unsavoury analogy between Brexit and toilet roll. He said the people will not settle for a "bog roll Brexit - soft, yielding and seemingly infinitely long". But Boris, the whole point is, most people can't afford Andrex.

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