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The dying art of saying thank-you, Percy Pigs and the Saint Laurent canvas shoulder bag

Oh thank goodness you've turned up. Take hold of this door would you. This reporter has been holding it open for people for ages. In the name of research you understand. She's been keeping a tally chart of how many people say thank-you and her reporter's notepad is looking depressingly bare.

You see, this has all arisen out of a study carried out into how often people from a variety of countries say the words "thank-you" and whilst, as you would expect, Britain, the nation of almost embarrassing deference, has come out top, the actual percentage of times we all thank someone in any given situation is surprisingly, and rather uncomfortably, low.

This reporter is possibly under a misconception that in days of yore we would have said thank-you far more. Maybe even the occasional please.

The study, analysing the interactions between local people speaking a total of eight languages across five continents, found Brits still only say "thank-you" on one out of seven occasions, amounting to just 14.5 per cent of the time.

Shortly behind the Brits were the Italians at 13.5 per cent. Those speaking indigenous languages, such as in Cha'palaa, Ecuador never say thank-you, whilst Russian speakers say thank-you three per cent of the time and the Polish, two per cent of the time.

Robin Dunbar, an anthropologist at Oxford University, said, however, that expressing gratitude and feeling gratitude are not the same thing. He added that just because English and Italian speakers made more frequent expressions of gratitude it did not mean they were any more grateful by nature.

But when it comes to Jamie Oliver, the world of social media is certainly saying thanks but no thanks - as thanks to him the future of Percy Pigs are under threat.

Following a campaign by the once hugely popular TV chef to ban cartoon imagery on unhealthy food stuffs in the name of fighting childhood obesity, the Marks and Spencer chewy pig-shaped sweet could be first on the chopping block.

The announcement has caused a Twitter storm in dimensions not experienced since Jamie declared a few weeks ago that two for one offers on pizza should be banned. Tweeters have declared the Percy Pig ban is the "final straw" when it comes to Oliver's attempts to get the nation eating more healthily.

To give you a flavour of the venom towards Jamie, one social media post read: "First two for one pizzas now Percy Pigs, watch me knock Jamie Oliver out I swear down." Another commented: "If Jamie Oliver gets rid of Percy Pigs he's had it".

An official spokesperson for Marks and Spencer said they had no plans to ban the sweets at this time.

Pray silence for the news and former film mogul Harvey Weinstein has appeared in court in New York to plead not guilty to rape and criminal sex act charges. The court case refers to sex crimes against just two individuals but dozens of Hollywood actresses have spoken out to say he sexually harassed or abused them during their careers. Mr Weinstein denies everything.

Handbag and fashion designer Kate Spade has been found dead at her home in New York in an apparent suicide. Officials say the body of the 55-year-old businesswoman was found by housekeeping staff inside her Park Avenue apartment on Tuesday morning. A note was found at the scene but no other details can be revealed.

Whilst an Australian woman has been charged for drink-driving a horse. The 51-year-old was arrested whilst riding the horse to an off licence and was found to be four times over the legal alcohol limit. A police spokesperson said he wanted to remind people drink driving did not just mean a vehicle, it can include a horse.

Thanks go to Vogue for rather nearly providing us with a run down of the most desirable vintage-inspired bags of the moment, rather neatly categorising them by decade. All bags tan, suede and beige feature in the 70's category with offerings from Chloe, Fendi and Gucci.

Eighties-inspired bags are all glossy lacquer, plush velvet and exotic skins. Burberry and Prada lead the charge in the 90's section with less than glamorous nylon the fabric of choice. Whilst the noughties celebrate all things pop culture, with bright bold imagery and garish prints.

This reporter suggests going as far back in time as your taste allows when choosing your next handbag. Saint Laurent's 70's inspired canvas shoulder bag for example. There may be a few retro-style thank-yous floating around in there.

Alternatively go noughties with Prada's comic print shoulder bag and you may stumble over the very last packet of Percy Pigs.

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