Skip to main content

Missing Journalist, Puffer Jackets and RIP the 18-30 Holiday

MAKING the headlines today is the news Turkish authorities are scouring motorway CCTV footage as suspicions continue to rise that dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi was murdered at Istanbul's Saudi consulate and his body smuggled out in a van.

Mr Khashoggi, a US-based critic of the Saudi leadership, went to the consulate to finalise his divorce and did not come back out. A convoy of six cars was seen leaving the consulate two hours later and boxes were caught on security footage being loaded into the back of a black van. Saudi authorities have denied any wrongdoing.

American President Donald Trump meanwhile said there were some pretty bad stories circulating about Khashoggi's fate but hopefully it would "sort itself out". He may as well have said that's one less to deal with.

The annual call has gone out to purchase a puffer jacket - and this year they must be heavily adorned and patterned. The puffer jacket, muses This Reporter, is much the fashion anomaly, in a world where trends are generally sent to make the wearer look teeny tiny, puffer jackets on the other hand make us look, essentially, like a giant walking marshmallow.

Handy for one thing - rebounding off the ice and snow we will inevitably slip on whilst wearing one. This Reporter guesses we must trust the fashion types on this one - in the same way we trust politicians.

With confidence in Europe, unnaturally, high over the possibility of securing a Brexit deal at the October Summit, it fell to No.10 Downing Street to bring our collective hopes crashing back down to earth - another reason to invest in that puffer jacket - with the announcement that actually there were still many issues to overcome.

A spokesperson said there was a huge difference between talking positively about a deal and finalising one and it was going to take some movement on the EU side in order to do so - and This Reporter doesn't think they were referring to EU Chief Jean Claude-Juncker mocking Theresa May's dance moves by jigging onto the stage himself the other day.

Elsewhere Prime Minister Mrs May is in jubilant mood, allegedly, over the results of a poll which concluded her a more popular choice for PM than Boris Johnson - due to being a more trustworthy and decent person (though that's a bit like winning a morality contest against a pilfering macaque monkey).

However, in news sent to ensure she doesn't get ahead of herself, she has been given an ultimatum by her MPs that she has one more shot at getting her Chequer's plan approved by the EU before abandoning it once and for all for something else. This must be one of the "issues" 10 Downing Street were talking about.

In the second piece of grocery-related news in as many days, Tesco has announced it is scrapping all its best before dates on its fruit and vegetables. In a bold move intended to reduce food waste, the supermarket chain will be leaving it up to the consumer to decide whether an apple or plum or broccoli floret has gone past its best. One word - carnage.

More shocking news comes in the form of travel agent Thomas Cook announcing it is scrapping its 18 to 30 holidays. The last flight to Magaluf takes off later this month before Thomas Cook retires the brand famed for its drunken revelry, for good, for lack of take-up.

Instead more focus will be put into Cook's Club, a recent, more upmarket launch, aimed at millennials, which promises them the chance to sample a "melting pot of cultures" and fill up on "affordable vegan delights". But with those best before labels coming off the fruit and veg, This Reporter gives it a week before they're back on the drink.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Corbyn's Bodyguard and the People's Vote

SUCH is the nation's obsession with BBC's Bodyguard, This Reporter would argue, that a journalist from the Mirror felt it fitting - nay, par to the course - to ask Jeremy Corbyn's bodyguard what question he should put to the Labour leader during the party conference, underway this week.

Abdul Abouker, for indeed, that is his name (and would we have been even remotely interested in this factoid pre-Keeley Hawes and Richard Madden enlivening our TV sets of a Sunday evening - "no This Reporter, absolutely not") admittedly didn't quite get to the crux of the issues dominating the 2018 Labour Conference in Liverpool - the anti-Semitism, the austerity, the People's Vote (more on that later).

Mr Abouker, 30, suggested Mr Corbyn be asked how he deals with all the stress. The answer, for anyone declaring an interest, is running, exercising, reading and tending his allotment. In between the stress of managing to avoid answering a single question on Brexit for the p…

Creative Brexit Thinking, #Papoose and the Fendi 'Vulva' Scarf

FROM the EU's call for creative Brexit thinking and Piers Morgan's "emasculating" papoose gripe, to that much talked about Fendi scarf, welcome to This Reporter's daily news and style round-up.

In the latest 'stating the blindingly obvious' study, research group Hope Not Hate found attitudes towards immigration are directly linked to socio-economic deprivation. The pervading view, extracted from the six-year-long project, was many people in deprived communities felt they had been "abandoned and left to rot" by the political establishment in preference to addressing the needs and wishes of new arrivals.

In quite frankly staggering news, Prime Minister Theresa May has, apparently, managed to get her Cabinet to agree to a united front on Brexit ahead of a key summit with the European Union. Details are sketchy, but what permeated strongly from the meeting room on Tuesday afternoon was the smell of frying bacon, as it was revealed Cabinet members we…

The Bambi Dress, Trump's Misfortune and Operation Arse

TODAY'S fashion pick is the Bambi mini dress by Rixo London. An unashamed nod to the 1980s with its puffed sleeves and sequin embellishment. And there's no better time than now to enjoy a bit of escapist vintage, even from a decade blighted by Thatcher.

But nothing a bit of glossing over swathes of history won't fix. Wasn't it great she was the first female Prime Minister? In the same way we'll say of Theresa May in a few decades time - if the world makes it - didn't she show a great strength for just hanging on?
Back to the dress, and This Reporter's only concern is over the name "Bambi". For starters, due to the devastating plot twist in the Disney portrayal, This Reporter has some concerns over the origin of the velvet. But what other message is the designer trying to convey? 
That the wearer will become splay-legged and unable to navigate this life's metaphorical ice rink or that she will merely have a penchant for befriending small rabbit…

Dancing Queen and the Balmain Metallic Jeans

THIS Reporter would firstly like to point out she urged Prime Minister Theresa May to wear a metallic outfit for her keynote conference speech yesterday (Wednesday). She even went to the effort of ripping the page out of Vogue magazine which stated metallics were "fashion protection from the state of the world" -  protection from the likes of Mrs May potentially, but this really isn't the time to quibble - and got it sent over tout suite by carrier pigeon to Birmingham.

Still Mrs May went with the black trouser suit. Readers if you have any sense, purchase the Balmain metallic high-rise straight leg jeans immediately. We're going to need them as we continue.

Of course, there has been much build up to this speech, following on as it does not only from Boris Johnson's leadership audition on Tuesday but also there being so much for Mrs May to rectify after last year's disaster. The hacking cough, the prankster waving the P45, the letters falling from the backdro…