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Pink Hair and Theresa May the Victim of Sexism?

THIS Reporter notes this is the week for pop stars to tuck their sequined gowns into their knickers and clamber over the divide into the contentious world of politics.

First American pop star Taylor Swift "broke her long-held political silence" - to quote the newspapers - by urging her fans to vote Democrat in the mid-term elections (and as a by-product Donald Trump declared he liked Swift's music 25 per cent less - he prefers Kanye West). And now British pop singer Paloma Faith has hit out at the widespread mockery of Theresa May's dance moves, saying the Prime Minister is unfairly criticised because of her gender.

She elaborates: "Why shouldn't Theresa May dance? I felt bad for her. I'm worried about her policies but I'm not worried about her dancing." Paloma continued it was indicative of how women in the public eye were treated more harshly than men, citing when Tony Blair revealed he was in a rock band, everyone thought he was cool.

This Reporter comments that she too has long believed Mrs May receives far more flack than if she were a man - the constant pitchforks at dawn call for her leadership to be challenged perhaps the strongest demonstration. However, this is a dangerous path to pursue, leading as it does to the potential whitewashing over of all valid criticism of her policies - of which there is plenty. Dismissing it all as unjustified sexism, all of which, it is not.

A clear example of the patriarchy thrusting its misogyny over womens' trajectory is Scarlett Curtis, compiler of the work "Feminists Don't Wear Pink (and Other Lies)", having her book display at Topshop taken down after Arcadia boss Philip Green, confusingly, said it did not fit with the brand.

Witness thus the avalanche of social media outcry that Sir Philip was depriving his young female customer base of a book of vital essays by feminist-leaning celebrities - including one by actress Keira Knightley detailing the amniotic indignities of childbirth. And then the crawl back from Sir Philip, that he would donate £25,000 of his pin money to charity as a sop.

Miss Curtis has since set up a Twitter hashtag #PinkNotGreen which has enjoyed much attention - as has her book - and This Reporter feels this would be the opportune time to discuss the pink hair trend. The boldest of hair hues from bubble gum pink through to deep crimson have been spotted along numerous catwalks for the Spring/Summer 2019 season, as well as on the heads of celebrities including Georgia May Jagger and Scarlett Curtis herself.

Surely this would be the ultimate in anti-Philip Green take downs, if once pink tressed-up, young fashionistas descended en masse upon his Arcadia offices, demanding the reinstatement of the book to Topshop stores. And if they could swing by - through slight diversion - the White House and belt out "Shake It Off" through Donald Trump's bedroom window, where he will no doubt be abed with a Big Mac and Coke - that would be rosy.


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