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Summer Riots, Eskimos and Camping It Up at the MET

THERE will be riots on the streets if the Government continues to roll out its controversial Universal Credit benefits system. That is the warning from former Prime Minister Gordon Brown who predicts a return to poll tax-style chaos and a summer of discontent if Theresa May does not call a halt to the scheme.

The Universal Credit system combines six benefits in one and is set for a full national roll out next year, despite countless reports of claimants already on it being plunged into dire financial straits as a result.

Mr Brown said: "Surely the greatest burning injustice of all is children having to go to school ill-clad and hungry. It is the poverty of the innocent - of children too young to know they are not to blame". This Reporter comments, it really must be a sign of the times, that Gordon Brown returning as Prime Minister seems a welcome idea.

Moving on and President of America, Donald Trump has declared his daughter Ivanka would be "dynamite" as the next UN Ambassador. This follows Mr Trump losing yet another member of his inner team this week as Nikki Haley resigned from the role on what is being portrayed as amicable grounds, but amid reports Ms Haley has her own sights set on the the 2020 President-ship.

Trump rambled on that there was "no one more competent in the whole world" than Ivanka to fill the position but he would be accused of nepotism if he pushed her forward. That yes - or the fact the very thought of the Trumpian dynasty having yet more powerful reach, is just too much to stomach.

Brexit is apparently reaching it final "frantic" stages with an intense line-up of meetings planned for next week to firm up the deal to present to the EU at the October Summit. The small question remains to the population at large what exactly that plan will look like as MPs continue to squabble.

What is really cheering is there is still so much positivity in the air - watch your step over that puddle of sarcasm - as Westminster is currently advertising for a team of "resilience workers" to help the country cope with the fallout of Brexit. They will be paid an annual salary of £50,000 and will initially be employed until June 2019 but "with the possibility of extension or permanency". This Reporter's advise to them -  don't make any plans.

North and South Korea are working on a unified dictionary after more than 70 years of division has left them with glaring vocabulary differences. Whilst technically the North and South speak the same language they use different words for a whole variety of things. For example whilst in South Korea, which has taken more words from English, a couple would talk about "going on a date", in North Korea they would call it "going for a walk" - confusing if the date involves sitting down.

In the South they say having an ice-cream. In the North it is called an "Eskimo" (which incidentally should replace ice-cream in all dictionaries). The move to bridge the language divide follows a reapproachment between the two leaders after three summits this year.

Finally fashionistas you need wonder no longer, as the MET Gala theme has been announced for 2019. The mega fashion event which takes place in New York in May each year gives countless celebs the chance to outdo each other at fancy dress and this time around will be based around "Camp" - the highbrow version. As taken from Susan Sontag's seminal essay "Notes on Camp", which argues for camp being the love of the unnatural, of artifice and exaggeration. It's certainly a step-up from tarts and vicars.


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