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The S Club 7 Tribute Group, Youth Strikes and Future Frills

FROM the S Club 7 tribute group and youth strikes playing merry hell with the parliamentary lawn, to future thrilling frills, welcome to a quite extraordinary edition of This Reporter's weekly news and style round-up.

Great defections of This Reporter's lifetime: Robbie Williams leaving Take That, Geri Halliwell splitting from the Spice Girls. For Robbie it was entertaining sold out stadiums and raking it in on millenniums for ever more. Geri treated us to leg warmers and a far from necessary cover of The Weather Girls.
What This Reporter is trying to say is defecting away from the band can yield mixed results - for both those going it alone and the ones left behind. Anything between Wembley and Wetherspoons.
So consider this. Seven MPs dramatically split from Labour and set themselves up unofficially as the "Independent Group" this week, citing irreconcilable differences over issues from anti-Semitism to Brexit: Chuka Umunna, Luciana Berger, Chris Leslie, Angela Smith, Mike Grapes, Gavin Shuker and Ann Coffey. Just where they will register on the success scale, only time will tell.
In fairness, the start looked promising, with MPs finally speaking their minds about the state of British politics. To paraphrase - up the proverbial creek. But the moment Angela Smith started mumbling about black people having a "funny tinge" it all went a bit Victoria Beckham's "You're out of you're mind" collaboration with Dane Bowers. And we certainly never want to hear that again. The solution however is quite simple - S Club 7 tribute group.
But holy bajeezus news just in, three Tory MPs have now defected to the Independent Group - Sarah Wollaston, Anna Soubry and Heidi Allen, along with an 8th Labour MP Joan Ryan. Looks like it's time to reform So Solid Crew. There were about a hundred of them.
Elsewhere, in sad old Brexitville, it was yet another day, yet another vote in Parliament on Prime Minister Theresa May's doom-laden plan. Though immediately we must question the factual accuracy of a couple of statements. Namely, whether this was indeed another day - did anyone happen to see a copy of The Telegraph? Or indeed if this was another vote, or whether in absence of any new Brexit angle, the motion put to MPs at the end of January had been put through an Artificial Intelligence word generator (rumour has it Elon Musk has just invented one) and tasked it with coming up with a host of different endings, to the same question.
Because after what had been rather optimistically, in hindsight, deemed a "Tory truce" when a majority voted in favour of Mrs May's plan a couple of weeks ago, only in this year of our Lord 2019, could the same motion produce a different outcome, as Mrs May lost this latest vote 303 votes to 258.
Reminder - this should have been the start of MP's February recess and many were sacrificing their holidays. But quite frankly for what good this regurgitated vote did in moving the Brexi-shambles onwards, they may as well have been skiing down the piste. Because with just 37 days to go until Brexit, they really are rather taking the...Latest is Mrs May failed yet again to wangle an alternative to the "backstop" with the EU, only faint murmurs it will be temporary. That's hardly a vote winner. Elon, crank up the AI word generator. We're going back in.
Journalists at the BBC are revolting over the decision to cut the length of the News at Ten by ten minutes to give way to what is being called "youth programming". The same youth one assumes who, far from sitting around watching mindless TV, have been out and about putting the older generation to shame by protesting against climate change this week. The News at Ten was extended back in 2015 to allow for, and This Reporter quotes: "more scope to explain the events that impact the country and help to make sense of the changing world". The plan to trim the news is set to take effect in March just weeks before Brexit. It doesn't take a genius to see what that's all about.
Back to the climate change strike and in "gall of the woman", Mrs May has lambasted the teenagers involved as being disruptive and get this - time wasting. Leader of the House Andrea Leadsom declared it "truancy not striking". Whilst others have bemoaned the state they left the newly laid parliamentary lawn. Not exactly a masterclass in appealing to the next generation.
Finally, it's a cruel twist of fate that at a time when our immediate future, quite frankly, couldn't seem any more "buggered", the fashion world decrees the great sartorial story of 2019 will be, frills. But there you are. This knowledge is based on the plethora of stars who have been spotted wearing frill-based extravaganzas on the red carpets of award ceremonies, but with actress Margot Robbie declared a "sparkly car wash" in her Chanel at the BAFTAs, it doesn't seem the most easy of wears.
Guardian Fashion suggests the frothy dress is a mindset not an outfit, akin to a four-year-old putting on a superhero costume. It is about the way it makes us feel, not how it looks. Perhaps, this is, after all, the best time for it. A case of a self-fulfilling prophecy; "I am wearing frills, therefore I am thrilled". This Reporter is opting for this frill trimmed mini skirt by MSGM. The future already seems more thrilling, but ask her the same question next week.

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