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Basketball legend Kobe Bryant dies and Carrie Symonds saves the badger

FROM the tragic death of basketball legend Kobe Bryant in a helicopter crash (and not without a BBC fluff-up), to Carrie Symonds accused of charming Boris Johnson into saving badgers, This Reporter brings you the news headlines on Monday 27th January 2020.

Former Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant, considered one of the greatest basketball players ever, has been killed alongside his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others in a helicopter crash in southern California.
His death, at the age of 41, has left fans around the world devastated and large crowds gathered outside the home of the Lakers, the Staples Centre, to pay tribute.
It was the BBC who, albeit unintentionally, marked the tragedy with a reporting fluff-up, namely on the News at Ten during a segment on Bryant, mistakenly including footage of basketball player LeBron James, who also plays for the Lakers, and to some eyes pays a passing resemblance. Paul Royall, editor of BBC News at Six and Ten, apologised and blamed "human error".
This Reporter can make no apology however, for yet again reporting on the Coronavirus, though we may be sick to death of hearing of it (if ever there was a more ill-advised pun), but the virus itself is chugging on apace with 80 deaths around the globe so far and 2,000 confirmed cases. However new speculative figures reckon some 100,000 people could be infected worldwide and we simply don't know the half of it, or some such other fraction.
In true perennial optimism, Dr Yvonne Doyle, England's director for health protection, said, when asked if there could be cases in the UK already: "I would expect so".
Prime Minister Boris Johnson has officially signed the Brexit Withdrawal Bill, as we romp on home to Brexit Day, this Friday (31st January). The moment captured for all prosperity, and dart boards, by his personal photographer Brooklyn Beckham (literally made up and only explained away by a desperate bid to renege reality).
And as we look ahead to a glorious post-Brexit Britain Mr Johnson has announced a new fast-track "global talent visa" to be launched just days after we Brexit to encourage scientists, researchers and mathematicians to come to the UK.
There is to be no limit on the amount of people that will be accepted into the country and it does not even matter if they have a job waiting for them, he continued. This Reporter ponders how long before PhD students are blamed, for everything?
And finally, Carrie Symonds is to find herself at the centre of a court case to probe how far she has been exerting her influence over her "boyfriend" Boris Johnson, after the government pulled a cull on badgers in Derbyshire.
Miss Symonds, a passionate animals rights defender, has been a staunch critic of the cull that is operating in ten counties. Why the suspicion? Well settle in...The decision to scrap the cull came three weeks after Symonds met with head of the Badger Trust, Dominic Dyer, and the farmers union, the NFU believe the meeting played a key role in the government ignoring scientific advice in favour of the culling.
What this case does provide, if nothing else, is a little window of clarity on why Miss Symonds inexplicably took up with Mr Johnson in the first place - to save the badger. And if proven true could be the most noble and selfless act to be actuated, this decade.

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